Gettysburg: The Civil War Battle Series, Vol. 6

Unabridged Audiobook

Written By: James Reasoner

Narrated By: Lloyd James

Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks

Date: May 2010

Duration: 11 hours 11 minutes

Summary:

Gettysburg is the sixth in a ten-book series spanning the Civil War and describing its effects on one Southern family.

Stonewall Jackson was dead, but Confederate morale was never higher. Will and Mac, the two eldest Brannon sons, are in the ranks of the Stonewall Brigade and Jeb Stuart's cavalry. As Jackson's former corps marches up the Shenandoah Valley, Lee's army follows, and they eventually clash at Gettysburg. Will is kept in the thick of the combat around Culp's Hill, while Mac sees action with the Southern cavalry at Hanover. Both are swallowed up in the melee of the fighting, and neither emerges unscathed.

Bruised and bleeding, the Confederate army stumbles back into Virginia, a fourth of their number dead. As news spreads of the defeat and the huge number of casualties, the Brannon clan in Culpeper County anxiously awaits word on the fates of two sons.

Genres:

  • Anonymous

    Plot is amatuerish. Has some value as history although much of the action takes place in places other than Getttysburg.

  • Steve

    Well paced and as always fairly historically acurate as far as the canvas the fictional characters are placed on. The utilization of the periods events with the characters makes it for easy listening and is interesting right to the last paragraph.Looking forward to the next.

  • Lori

    Very disappointing. Human stories could have been good, but with no ending to most, I was left hanging and confused. It jumped from 1 storyline to another with no transition. Ending was just ridiculous. No montion of Gettysburg until three-quarter of the way through the story. Not at all what I was expecting or hoping for. Not at all recommended for history buffs expecting real and complete stories of the Gettysburg experience.

  • John Stephens

    A disappointment. Author Reasoner never ventures beyond the most superficial American Civil War sterotypes and seems to make no effort to expand our understanding of the critical Battle of Gettysburg. The melodrama is not helped by the reading - amateurish and annoying, the characterizations rarely rise above the acting level found in a fraternity skit.