Loving Frank

Unabridged Audiobook

Written By: Nancy Horan

Narrated By: Joyce Bean

Publisher: Brilliance Audio

Date: August 2007

Duration: 13 hours 42 minutes

Summary:

I have been standing on the side of life, watching it float by. I want to swim in the river. I want to feel the current. So writes Mamah Borthwick Cheney in her diary as she struggles to justify her clandestine love affair with Frank Lloyd Wright. Four years earlier, in 1903, Mamah and her husband, Edwin, had commissioned the renowned architect to design a new home for them. During the construction of the house, a powerful attraction developed between Mamah and Frank, and in time the lovers, each married with children, embarked on a course that would shock Chicago society and forever change their lives. In this groundbreaking historical novel, fact and fiction blend together brilliantly. While scholars have largely relegated Mamah to a footnote in the life of America's greatest architect, author Nancy Horan gives full weight to their dramatic love story and illuminates Mamah's profound influence on Wright. Drawing on years of research, Horan weaves little-known facts into a compelling narrative, vividly portraying the conflicts and struggles of a woman forced to choose between the roles of mother, wife, lover, and intellectual. Horan's Mamah is a woman seeking to find her own place, her own creative calling in the world, and her unforgettable journey, marked by choices that reshape her notions of love and responsibility, leads inexorably to this novel's stunning conclusion.

Genres:

  • Lorna

    We all know about FLW's houses and buildings but how many of us know about the woman he left his first wife for? Wikipedia supports the basic facts. Keep reading to hear the ending! Pleasantly read.

  • Anonymous

    I really like the book, and have recommended it to others, who equally like it. Strong story, evocative words, yet there is no strong denouement, so those of you who want AN ENDING aren't going to find it here. I've always admired Frank Lloyd Wright, and this was a fascinating look at his 'middle years'.