Forty Acres: A Thriller

Unabridged Audiobook

Written By: Dwayne Alexander Smith

Narrated By: Andre Blake

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Date: July 2014

Duration: 12 hours 41 minutes

Summary:

What if overcoming the legacy of American slavery meant bringing back that very institution? A young black attorney is thrown headlong into controversial issues of race and power in this page-turning and provocative new novel.

Martin Grey, a smart, talented black lawyer working out of a storefront in Queens, becomes friendly with a group of some of the most powerful, wealthy, and esteemed black men in America. He’s dazzled by what they’ve accomplished, and they seem to think he has the potential to be as successful as they are. They invite him for a weekend away from it all—no wives, no cell phones, no talk of business. But far from home and cut off from everyone he loves, he discovers a disturbing secret that challenges some of his deepest convictions…

Martin finds out that his glittering new friends are part of a secret society dedicated to the preservation of the institution of slavery—but this time around, the black men are called “Master.” Joining them seems to guarantee a future without limits; rebuking them almost certainly guarantees his death. Trapped inside a picture-perfect, make-believe world that is home to a frightening reality, Martin must find a way out that will allow him to stay alive without becoming the very thing he hates.

A novel of rage and compassion, good and evil, trust and betrayal, Forty Acres is the thought-provoking story of one man’s desperate attempt to escape the clutches of a terrifying new moral order.

Genres:

  • Dwan Burton

    Martin seemed rather naïve during so many parts of the story, especially for him to be an attorney. Which made some scenes a bit difficult to buy into. As we see from the beginning he is a smart and logical thinker and a pretty successful attorney. But his common sense was sometimes nowhere to be found when it was needed most. And I would have been a lot more skeptical about the whole 40 acres upon my arriving once things started to look out of order. Certainly I would not have been as trusting of these men as Martin was. The apple pie scene had me feigning for some hot apple pie so bad. I literally went out to get some. The author probably should have played up Martins civil rights background a bit more throughout the story to suggest one way or the other his willingness or not for social justice. By that I mean the reader should have been a little bit more inclined to know whether Martin would go so far as to be a co conspirator in reverse slavery. I counted at least 3 times in the book where simple math was incorrect and it became really distracting. I'm glad the book wasn't super predictable but since most of the book takes place at forty acres the first portion introduction of Martin's law partner Glen seemed irrelevant and forgettable by the end when it seemed to matter most. Selling Dr. Kasim's character would have been better if we were introduced to additional facts or background on him and what made him so revered. Like learning more about what his teachings or beliefs a bit earlier or what he studied to get him where he was. Overall I thought the book was good and thought provoking. Especially in today's political climate. And I would like to see the aftermath played out in a sequel.