Stoner

Unabridged Audiobook

Written By: John Williams

Narrated By: Robin Field

Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks

Date: June 2010

Duration: 9 hours 49 minutes

Summary:

William Stoner is born at the end of the nineteenth century into a dirt-poor Missouri farming family. Sent to a university to study agronomy, he instead falls in love with English literature and embraces a scholar's life. As the years pass, Stoner encounters a series of disappointments: marriage into a "proper" family estranges him from his parents; his career is stymied; his wife and daughter turn coldly away from him; a transforming experience of new love ends under threat of scandal. Driven ever deeper within himself, Stoner rediscovers the stoic silence of his forebears and confronts an essential solitude. John Williams' deeply moving novel is a work of quiet perfection. William Stoner emerges not only as an archetypal American but as an unlikely existential hero, standing in stark relief against an unforgiving world.

"A perfect novel, so well told and beautifully written, so deeply moving, it takes your breath away."—New York Times Book Review

Genres:

  • Andreas Zacho

    A funny yet moving book that spans a lifetime. You feel for the protagonist and every side character is memorable. Robin Field makes the characters feel alive and diverse. Excellent! One of my favorite books of all time!

  • deepak p

    It has been my experience to let my mind wander when i am listening to an audio book. Rewinds inevitably follow. But not with 'Stoner'. The superb narration clutches you and you are hooked....what a treat!

  • Liza

    I am torn about this book. The writing style is very good and reminds a lot of Wallace Stegner. It is hard to go through the first quarter of the book that is very slow, but it improves later on. But the story itself left me quite unsatisfied. Stoner lives a life of misery, of acceptance, most of the time even of a victim. He lets his wife ruin his life, his relationship with his daughter and his daughter's life. He's just there, passive, as if he can't move his little finger. In the rare cases that he does rebel, it is rather a passive-aggresive sad protest. Maybe I have more of an issue with passive people that let their life crumble in front of their eyes, maybe it is because I wanted something to happen and not enough did. So 3.5 stars. So no question that Stegner is a few levels above this, especially with Stegner's engaging plots.

  • robert buckman

    This book is a great work of art. The narrator does it justice.