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White Like Me

Unabridged Audiobook

Written By: Tim Wise

Narrated By: Tim Wise

Publisher: Novel Audio

Date: December 2015

Duration: 11 hours 6 minutes

Summary:

With a new preface and updated chapters, White Like Me is one-part memoir, one-part polemical essay collection. It is a personal examination of the way in which racial privilege shapes the daily lives of white Americans in every realm: employment, education, housing, criminal justice, and elsewhere.

Using stories from his own life, Tim Wise demonstrates the ways in which racism not only burdens people of color, but also benefits, in relative terms, those who are "white like him." He discusses how racial privilege can harm whites in the long run and make progressive social change less likely. He explores the ways in which whites can challenge their unjust privileges, and explains in clear and convincing language why it is in the best interest of whites themselves to do so. Using anecdotes instead of stale statistics, Wise weaves a narrative that is at once readable and yet scholarly, analytical and yet accessible.

Genres:

  • Quanterius H

    I needed this book i am a Black 26 year old native of the Nashville/Columbia/Franklin. i loved this account of historical facts and how you chronologically ordered these events in your life. it taught me so so much about integrity and decency, ultra informative and just honest our people have pleaded for this type of honesty and in 2017 truth is a loose concept.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful.

  • Lynn S

    If I could up-vote the Review by Jack Barnes I would. This is a book authored by the idiocy of a sheltered life. As a white man who grew up in the ghetto I can assure you I had no privilege. The reality was "poor white trash" was perhaps more isolated as we did not have the supporting culture of our peers as the black families did.But, it is less about race and more about the struggle to survive poverty as it is all over the world. Thankfully, I had a mother who insisted I get an education and when I wasn't able to go to school she made sure I read at least a book a week from the public library. By the age of 11 I knew that education was the way out of the ghetto. By the age of 16 I knew that I needed to separate myself totally from the ghetto and the people I knew there. Privilege was realizing that I could educate myself and then work my way out of poverty. This was true for my peers in the black community as well. The author hasn't a clue as to what that really entails. For example, showing up for a job interview clean, dressed appropriately and prepared isn't dependent on skin color.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful.

  • Jack Barnes

    This sort of racial prejudice is regressive. A person's "privilege" isn't determined by skin color. There are many wealthy black people and many homeless white people. This is nothing but regressive social justice and an attempt to deepen the racial divide instead of heal it. The author should be ashamed.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful.

  • Kera Lovell

    Fascinating book and a really important topic in our "post-racial" society